Legal essay example



National DNA Day commemorates the completion of the Human Genome Project in April 2003 legal essay example the discovery of the double helix of DNA in 1953. Next year’s DNA Day will be on Thursday, April 25, 2019.

14th Annual DNA Day Essay Contest! This contest is open to students in grades 9-12 worldwide and asks students to examine, question, and reflect on important concepts in genetics. Essays are expected to be well-reasoned arguments indicative of a depth of understanding of the concepts related to the essay question. They are evaluated by ASHG members through three rounds of scoring. The submission website for this year’s contest will open in early January, 2019 and the deadline to submit is March 8, 2019. If you have any questions, please email DNA Day. Did you know that the DNA Day Essay Contest won an award?

We are pleased to share that this contest has received an ASAE Power of A Silver Award! These awards recognize a select number of organizations annually that distinguish themselves with innovative, effective, and broad-reaching programs that positively impact the United States and the world. See the 2018 winners and read their essays on the DNA Day Essay Contest Winners’ Page! Congratulations to the winners and honorable mentions.

His genetic counselor, Karen, seeks Jonathan’s consent to disclose this diagnosis to his daughter, Sarah, who is 25. Jonathan refuses to allow Karen or anyone else on the medical staff to reveal this diagnosis to Sarah. Parents may only submit the essays of home-schooled students. Only one entry may be submitted for each student. Each teacher may only submit six student essays per class, for up to three classes. Essays must be submitted electronically through the ASHG submission site no later than 5:00 pm Eastern Standard Time on March 8, 2019.

Essays mailed, faxed, or emailed to the Society will NOT be accepted. Once submitted, essays cannot be changed or revised. All essays must be written in English and are limited to 750 words. Word count includes in-text citations, but does not include reference lists.

Essay titles are optional and will be counted towards the word limit. Word count is best determined by Microsoft Word’s count. The submission page will give an official word count when submitters enter the essay. Essays should not include a student’s name. Essays must include at least one reference. Students may use either APA or MLA style citations. Quality of references will be considered by judges when scoring.

Plagiarism Plagiarism will not be tolerated. The text of the student’s essay must be his or her own words unless quotations are explicitly noted. If plagiarism is suspected during any point of the contest, ASHG’s Citation and Attribution Review Board will examine the essay in question. Essays found to contain the uncited work of others will be disqualified and the student’s teacher will be notified. Only classroom teachers are eligible for the equipment grant. Teachers of first-place winners from 2015, 2016, 2017, and 2018 are not eligible for equipment grants in 2019. Each round of judges is made up of ASHG members.

Round 1 essays will be judged solely on whether or not they are of high enough quality. The chosen essays will move on to Round 2 and eventually a selected group will move on to Round 3. Judges in Rounds 2 and 3 will use the rubric below. Each essay in Rounds 1 and 2 will be reviewed by at least 3 judges. Follow the rubric below to help craft your essay.

Judges use this rubric to evaluate every essay in the second and third rounds of judging. Please Note Text from essays may be used for research purposes to identify misconceptions, misunderstandings, and areas of student interest in genetics. Student text may be published on the ASHG website, newsletter, or in other ASHG-supported publications. Format Does the 750 word count include images and their descriptions?